Does innovation create more value when based on science? Yes, but…

A new study concludes that corporate innovations built on scientific discoveries create more value but also entail more risk  For as long as there have been corporations, there has been a relationship between them and researchers. Indeed, the Dutch East India Company — one of the most important precursors of today’s corporations — hired scientists and maintained a strong knowledge…

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Sparking innovation: how temporary assignments increase knowledge transfer and learning

New analysis of manufacturing interplant rotation programs sheds valuable light on how new work settings increase knowledge transfer and lifelong learning Analysis: One of the most common practices in current organizational management is the temporary assignment of workers from one function to perform a similar role in another part of the company or even at an…

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Day science, night science: Understanding the nature of scientific discovery and creativity

Any working scientist (and I know quite a few) will tell you that this model of the scientific method bears only a conceptual resemblance to how science plays out in real life. Indeed, François Jacob (who shared the 1965 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine with André Lwoff and Jacques Monod) developed a much more accurate representation…

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Better early than late: how leader handoffs affect innovation projects

New research from Stanford looks at the impact changing leaders has in bringing new ideas to market In Brief: New research from a team at Stanford examines the impact that leadership handoffs have on innovation projects. The team concluded that early-stage handoffs are the optimal option. When these are not possible, multiple handoffs of more…

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